Insurance for Adventure Travel Tours

Lots of people like adventure travel these days. Everything from river kayaking tours, sea kayaking tours, sky diving, scuba diving, cross country treks, cross country cycling and skiing to more extreme stuff like white water rafting, rock climbing, base jumping, para gliding, bungee jumping or similar high-risk activities. If you are going on an adventure tour, don’t forget to check out your insurance cover before you head off.

This is particularly the case if you are going overseas to do any of these activities. Don’t skimp on it, it’s not worth the risk!

Suffering an injury can not only sour your holiday or adventure, it can be financially devastating, particularly in countries where medical care is either expensive, or very poor (in which case an airlift out of the country may be required). You certainly don’t want to find out you don’t have the right insurance cover after you’ve been injured.

Suffering an injury can not only sour your holiday or adventure, it can be financially devastating, particularly in countries where medical care is either expensive, or very poor (in which case an airlift out of the country may be required). You certainly don’t want to find out you don’t have the right insurance cover after you’ve been injured.

While holiday travel insurance can save you from minor mishaps, lost luggage or tourist scams, it’s probably not going to save the wildly adventurous travelers from more significant events. According to the Insurance Council of Australia, dangerous activities are excluded from most insurance policies. And it’s not just rock climbers, skiers and anyone who wants to run with the bulls who are at risk. Even more sedate activities like sea kayaking and quad biking are on most insurance companies exclusion lists.

The good news is that if you speak to your insurer about your adventures and put some extra cash up-front, cover can be provided for most things. Start by searching the internet for insurance policies that are specifically designed to suit. You can also check with the industry organisations that cover the activity and they can often point you in the right direction.

In addition to covering yourself, don’t forget to cover your equipment. Look for a policy that covers the replacement cost of stolen or damaged gear so that you can continue your adventure. The price of this sort of gear can easily exceed the standard replacement value that most insurance policies place on single items.

Remember, insurance is a competitive industry and insurance providers will want to provide you with the lowest quote. But companies work on the basis that travelers undertaking high-risk activities will potentially rack up big bills, such as recovery and evacuation from a remote location. They know what they’re taking on and you should take this as proof that things can get expensive. Getting choppered out of the mountains will pretty quickly eat up your cash. Even worse, some private rescue companies will not go and get you unless you can show that you have the right level of medical insurance or can guarantee payment.

When you compare policies, look for those that offer top medical cover and evacuation back to Australia, not just to the nearest foreign hospital. The extra cost will look like a pittance if you end up needing this type of service.

Also consider what activity you will be doing. If you are going on a kayaking tour the risk of injury is probably less than other activities, however you may take a lot more gear, so your focus should be on replacing this gear. Also check what the tour operator covers for you (if anything).

If you are rushing to get ready for your adventure and don’t have time to do your own research, don’t just leave it and hope for the best, consider consulting an insurance broker to do the research for you. Be open and honest about what you are planning to do, where you’re going, and even what activities you might potentially do once you’re there.

Also check any existing life insurance or disability insurance you have as it may cover some eventualities – if not while you are away, when you are back home.

Lastly, visiting a country against the Federal Government’s advice will invalidate many policies. Check with the Department of Foreign Affairs.

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